Hondurans: A new life in Chicago

During Orlenda Caseres’ two-month journey in 1995, she crossed borders between four countries: Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico and the United States. Caseres, 19 at that time, walked for most of the time, and sometimes swam or “traversed the desert,” as she said. But the danger and expense were worthwhile. In her home country, like other Hondurans, she was struggling to live.

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From image to action? On photography and the Syrian crisis

In 2016, the world was horrified by a photograph of 5-year-old Omran Daqneesh caked in dust and blood while riding in the back of an ambulance after a drone strike in Syria. For Catherine Edelman, the emotions sparked by the photograph laid bare both the potential and shortcomings of photography and art as tools to end violence, displacement and war

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Mexico City-born artist Amanda Gutiérrez uses sound to address gentrification

The screech of a train, the ring of paleta-cart bells and the chatter of children—these sounds define Pilsen in the summer. And artist Amanda Gutiérrez is listening to every sound the neighborhood has to offer. She has called Pilsen, a neighborhood on the Southwest Side of Chicago, home for over 15 years. “I feel very emotionally and historically attached to this neighborhood,” she said.

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Art is a crucial form of resistance and healing for Palestinians, says local artist

The trauma she experienced during the Second Intifada continues to haunt Mary Hazboun, a 34-year-old Palestinian artist and folk singer from Bethlehem. She’s now channelled some of her pain into an art project titled “The Art of Weeping.”

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When CoreCivic Comes to Town: Lessons from Elkhart’s Grassroots Struggle to Preserve a Vibrant Community

In Elkhart, Indiana, an ICE civil detention facility was proposed at the intersection of county roads 7 and 26, a stretch of weeds and snow next to the county’s correctional facility and its huge, methane-leaking landfill. This unremarkable piece of nowhere, Indiana would have held over a thousand immigrants. They would have been held in a private, maximum-security facility with the capability to hold 60 in solitary confinement, encased in a total visual barrier. Would have — because Elkhart, like so many Chicagoland towns before it, said no.

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